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Who’s Moving Where In Wealth Management? – Mishcon de Reya

Editorial Staff

16 May 2024

Mishcon de Reya
has appointed Marianne Kafena and Idina Glyn as partners in the Mischcon Private team in its London office to boost the firm’s offering, the firm said in statement.

Kafena advises high net worth families, family offices and private businesses based in the Middle East. With 20 years of experience, Kafena can advise clients in Arabic and French as well as English. Previously she had been a partner at Harbottle & Lewis since 2020. Before that, Kafena was a partner at Farrer & Co for six years.

Glyn – formerly a senior associate at Forsters – advises on transactional and advisory property matters alongside onshore tax, trust, succession, charity, super prime central London property matters and art law.

"Their wide-ranging experience and deep technical expertise will bolster our private offering, especially in estates and family business matters where they have significant reputations. Marianne has extensive experience advising families and businesses in the Middle East while Idina has significant expertise in drawing on a range of legal disciplines to find solutions to complex transactional or succession planning challenges, all of which brings strength and depth to our offering in this area,” Nick Davis, partner and chair of Mishcon Private, said.

These new partners follow the appointment in Asia of partners Timothy Burns and Wei Zhang who provide expert US tax and wealth planning for high net worth clients in Asia. They joined in November 2023 from Withers where they were partners.

Mishcon de Reya is an independent law firm, which now employs over 1,400 people with more than 650 lawyers offering a wide range of legal services to companies and individuals. With a presence in London, Oxford, Cambridge, Singapore and Hong Kong (through its association with Karas So), the firm services an international community of clients and provides advice in situations where the constraints of geography often do not apply.